An overview of the history of the kurds

The cease-fire has now ended. The conflict is deeply rooted in the imperialist history of the Middle East, involving the Ottoman Turkish empire, as well as the British and Western powers who were dividing up the region after World War I. After the collapse of the Ottoman Turkish empire, Turkish nationalists, led by Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, fought off the imperialist powers, which were seekng to divide what is today Turkey into smaller territories.

An overview of the history of the kurds

Jan 24, Matthew Griffiths rated it really liked it An interesting discussion of the recent history of the Kurds, generally speaking from the end of the 19th century on that charts the role they have played in the wider region and the space they filled in the states of Iran prior to the First World War and the newly formed nation states of Turkey and Iraq after WW1.

An overview of the history of the kurds

The main focus of the book I would say is the slow development of the concept of a Kurdish identity separate and distinct to either Turkish, Arabic or Iranian and the struggles that t An interesting discussion of the recent history of the Kurds, generally speaking from the end of the 19th century on that charts the role they have played in the wider region and the space they filled in the states of Iran prior to the First World War and the newly formed nation states of Turkey and Iraq after WW1.

The main focus of the book I would say is the slow development of the concept of a Kurdish identity separate and distinct to either Turkish, Arabic or Iranian and the struggles that the development of this identity has encountered in the form of repression and inter tribal rivalries. This was an enjoyable read and has left me with a greater understanding of the pressing need in my opinion for the international community to fully support Kurdish rights in the same way that it does Palestinian rights but I would add as a caveat that this is a very in-depth account and not something to pick up lightly.

The Kurds, a people divided by nationality, religion, language and tribe, still share a common identity throughout the countries of the Middle East. This book focuses on their recent history in Turkey, Iraq, and Iran, where they live as large and important minorities. The pos The author David McDowall traces the roots of Kurdish nationalism from the collapse of the Kurdish emirates which were part of the Ottoman Turkey and Iraq and Qajar Iran empires until the start of the twentieth century.

History of the Kurds - Wikipedia

The post World War I peace settlements had even planned for the creation of one or several Kurdish nations for which the Kurds themselves were unprepared, lacking an educated non-tribal social class until several decades later.

But the newly established regimes in Turkey, Iraq, and Iran also tended to regard their own modernization with state nationalism, subordination of ethnic identities, and centralized control.

The Kurds themselves had to transform their own societies from one based on divisive tribal patronage to one of a unified national ethnic identity. This is a very detailed work, probably the most comprehensive treatment of modern Kurdish history, which is sometimes difficult to digest since so many of the facts presented are not part of more well-known narrative of Middle Eastern history.

An overview of the history of the kurds

For instance, the Armenian Holocaust has been recognized as part of the history of the demise of the Ottoman Empire; some million and a half Armenians may have perished, many of them massacred by Kurdish forces, but the Kurds suffered their own losses, perhaps as many as a million deaths.

As moslems, They tended to regard themselves as loyal Ottoman subjects who defended the the Caliph, the Sultan in Istanbul. After abolition of the Caliphate, Ataturk was at first supportive of their cultural rights, but later as his interests shifted to Turkish nationalism, he suppressed any hints of a Kurdish national identity.

The Kurds later even became victims of genocidal policies in Turkey and Iraq where any attempts to establish autonomous Kurdish regions were brutally put down with huge death tolls of whole communities. Iran has not treated its Kurds much better with the bloody abolition of the Soviet sponsored Mahabad Republic and the widespread execution of separatists after the Islamic Revolution.

Political developments in the Kurdish aspirations for self-determinism are still being played out; as this was actually an older edition of the book, a new one is being written.History of the Kurds SUMMARY Before SUMMARY The s. Shah Ismail I establishes the Safavid dynasty in Persia Shah Ismail I consolidates power in Kurdistan There are important Kurdish minorities in Iraq, Iran, Turkey, and Syria, and Iraq’s Kurds are concentrated in The Kurdish language and traditional way of life The Kurdish language is a West Iranian language related to Persian and Pashto.

Kevin McKiernan has reported on the Kurds of Iraq, Iran, Turkey, and Syria since , but he began his career as a journalist in the s covering armed confrontations by Native Americans. History of Turkish Occupation of Northern Kurdistan Since , and especially the last few months, the domestic problems of a major N.A.T.O, Middle Eastern, and American ally state have come to the forefront of the international news scene.

Overview of Recent History of Kurds in Iraq The Kurds have more or less had an autonomous region in Iraq since , with it formally recognised in Iraq’s constitution as an autonomous region in In writing "The Modern History of the Kurds" David McDowall used material primarily from British diplomatic and military archives.

The result is a marvellous book on the political history of the Kurds and the diplomatic manoeuvring of the Western powers present in the region.4/5.

A Modern History of the Kurds by David McDowall